Books I’m working on – for publication in 2019

I’ve had a few lovely mini-breaks already this summer in Norfolk, Suffolk and the Lake District, but now it’s time to get my head down as, sadly, and perhaps unsurprisingly, I pretty much failed in my plan to have the summer off with my boys. It seemed that at some point in the last year I started saying yes to all the projects I was … Continue reading Books I’m working on – for publication in 2019

What I translated in 2017… and what’s out in 2018

This year has been an extremely busy one with some very enjoyable and satisfying books to translate. I’ve fulfilled a personal ambition: I was hoping to translate one novel from each of my three languages by the time I was 40, which I’ve managed with a couple of years to spare! It’s also been a longstanding ambition to get into children’s books, and I’ve started … Continue reading What I translated in 2017… and what’s out in 2018

Farewell to the Horse: The Final Century of Our Relationship

*** BBC Radio 4’s Book of the Week from 29 May! *** *** Sunday Times History book of the year 2017 *** “Farewell to the Horse is an engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to us. Cities, farmland, entire industries were once shaped  as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. … Continue reading Farewell to the Horse: The Final Century of Our Relationship

The Crossing: My Journey to the Shattered Heart of Syria

By: Samar Yazbek Translated by: Nashwa Gowanlock and Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp Published: Rider Books (Penguin Random House) 2015 Reviews ‘The Crossing is not simply reportage or political analysis. It bears comparison with George Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia as a work of literature. Yazbek is a superb narrator who knows how to pace her text, craft dialogue and convey a universal sense of grief; this is how she crosses … Continue reading The Crossing: My Journey to the Shattered Heart of Syria

The new divide: why the world didn’t get better

The fall of the Berlin Wall created a bigger gap between rich and poor than there was previously in eastern Europe, and discrimination against minorities continues today, argues award-winning German author Thomas Rothschild The latest edition of Index on Censorship includes an article I translated by Thomas Rothschild on the resurgence of nationalism across Europe and the worsening economic divide since the fall of the … Continue reading The new divide: why the world didn’t get better